The 10th ACM SIGCHI Symposium on Engineering Interactive Computing Systems

19-22 June, 2018 - Paris, France

 

Keynotes

Jennifer Mankoff, University of Washington
Fabricating Accessibility

Abstract

With the increasing power and flexibility of technologies available to consumers, we are seeing a revolution in how assistive technology (AT) is being created and by whom. This talk will highlight the potential of these technologies for people with disabilities, as well as the challenges that end users face in leveraging them effectively to address AT issues.

Bio

Jennifer Mankoff is the Ladner Professor in the Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington. Jennifer applies a human-centered perspective to combining empirical methods and technical innovation to solve pressing social problems in areas such as accessibility, health and sustainability. Her focus is on improving tools and exploring value at the intersection of Fabrication and Accessibility. Jennifer received her PhD at Georgia Tech, advised by Gregory Abowd and Scott Hudson, and her B.A. from Oberlin College. Her previous faculty positions include UC Berkeley’s EECS department and Carnegie Mellon’s HCI Institute. Jennifer has been recognized with an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, IBM Faculty Fellowship and Best Paper awards from ASSETS, CHI and Mobile HCI. Some supporters of her research include Autodesk, Google Inc., the Intel Corporation, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Microsoft Corporation and the National Science Foundation.

Philippe Palanque, Université Paul Sabatier – Toulouse III, France
Engineering Automations: From a Human Factor Perspective to Design, Implementation and Validation Challenges

Abstract

While engineers have always been working at producing systems automating operator’s tasks, the Human Factors community has been studying hazards of automation and potential dangers that might arise from their deployment, especially in critical contexts. The presentation will highlight the underlying contradictions between interactive systems and automation, starting from the MABA-MABA (Fitts 1951) over simplification which divides the world of actions between what machines are better at and what men are better at. I will then highlight the challenges to face in order to design, implement and validate interactive systems that exhibit autonomous behaviors. I will demonstrate that these challenges take place at every level of interactive systems architecture and require pluri-disciplinary skills to address them. Illustrative examples will be taken from multiple applications domains (such as aircraft cockpits, air traffic management, satellite ground segments and desktop applications).

Bio

Philippe Palanque is professor in Computer Science at the University Toulouse 3 and is head of the ICS (Interactive Critical Systems) research group at IRIT. Since 1997, he works on research projects in the area of civil aviation, air traffic management and satellite ground segments. He is now involved in the specification of future interactive cockpits and in the modelling of operational states of civil aircraft (with direct support from and close collaboration with Airbus). He has been working in the area of automation for more than ten years. He was a member of the SESAR Higher Automation Levels in Aviation network of excellence and paper co-chair of ATACCS (Application and Theory of Automation in Command and Control Systems) 2015 conference. He is the secretary of the IFIP Working group 13.5 on Resilience, Reliability, Safety and Human Error in System Development and is steering committee chair of the CHI conference series at ACM SIGCHI. He is a member of the CHI academy and chair of IFIP Technical Committee on Human-Computer Interaction (TC13). He edited and co-edited more than twenty books or conference proceedings and co-authored more than 200 refereed publications in international conferences and journals including the “Handbook on Formal Methods in Human-Computer Interaction” published by Springer in 2017.